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canon eos 1000D good?


RedneckR0nin

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In regards to what? Do you want to do macro shots? What is your budget for a camera? Are you a experienced photographer with much experience with a P&S camera? These are all things that need to be answered before I could gove you a answer. It is not a bad entry level DSLR that is for sure. If your looking at doing macro though you will need to also focus on lens, extender tubes(option) and on top I suggest a external flash!

To get the butterfly shot as is I imagine it would do this just fine. Again for what your going to use it for and you experience level and budget are all important factors in this question as well!
 

Burned Ice

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i'm fifteen and it's my sisters camera, so that will answer the first needed answered question: i don't have experience, macro shots will be another purpose for it, budget for a camera, is that for lenses for example?
 

RedneckR0nin

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Yeah you will find that a lens is everything along side with Camera body and lighting. Ya it would be a good camera for you to learn on if you can afford one. To give you a idea the difference a lens can be cost wise and performance wise I have two different 15-35mm lenses. One I bought a couple years ago and one about three months ago. The difference in price is the Tamaron cost me about 300 bucks....the EF-S Canon cost me about 2800. The performance is night and day difference and good glass performs well where others will not. I wouldn't worry about that too much though for now. Learn the basics and how a camera views and how to run it first before you get all crazy on add ons. I think this would be a good purchase if you are truly interested in photography or at least think you are. Then if it turns out it is not your thing or nothing you want to get too serious about you still have a pretty great camera for shots...if it does turn out you really like it , gives you a great camera to kick the crap outta of before you eventually make that step into a high end amateur/semi pro model camera!
Hope that helps!
 
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Hoogle

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Nikon D60 versus Canon Rebel XS / EOS 1000D Kit
it is a good camera but my honest opinion things like lenses tend to be more expensive but you can use sigma lenses which are cheaper or other compatable lenses I would highly recomend Tamron they only make lenses so are very good at it and a lot cheaper than Nikor / canon also the Nikon d300 worth a look at
 

Hoogle

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to be honest it is whatever you can get a good price on but stick to canon or Nikon all though it is said that canons are more noob friendly with a lot easier pre set modes but that is debatable yeaj there are a lot more manual modes in the Nikon but do you need it for a first dslr no I am a Nikon fan boy though I love my Nikon and I am looking at buying the d3 now and get the canon equivelant so I can try it out
 

Burned Ice

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are lenses made for specific camera's or for a wide gamma of camera's
 

RedneckR0nin

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are lenses made for specific camera's or for a wide gamma of camera's
Lenses are brand based with ones like Sigma and Tamaron making them for all major makes of camera. The thing is though is the performance of a Nikon lens for example will have a Canon counter part. If you get that Canon though you will only be able to use EOS lenses and the compatible ones made by a outside company.
 

siodre

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for canon you need an ef-mount. if the canon camera has a cropped sensor (the 1000d does, so does the xxxd series, xxd series and 7d) then you can also use ef-s lenses. lots of manufacturers (canon, sigma, tamron, etc..) make canon mount lenses, just make sure they're canon ef or ef-s mount before you buy or they won't fit. they may also be marked for canon EOS which is the same thing.

if you're interested in macro shots and on a budget i'd hold off on the macro lens, a good true 1:1 macro lens will set you back quite a bit of money. the 100mm macro for example is $1000 USD. instead get a set of kenko extension tubes with the canon ef mount, they'll fit between your camera and lens. an extension tube essentially enlarges the image projected onto the camera's sensor giving it a better macro ratio. i suggest the kenko set because for $109ish USD you can get 3 different size extension tubes and you can stack them for added effect.

Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG for Canon EOS Lens AEXTUBEDGC
 

Burned Ice

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i'm also/mostly interested in 'micro' shots, i love watching those detailed close-up photo's
 

Hoogle

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in all fairness you are on a budget so my first buy would be a decent body with a kit lense setup of 18-55 and 55-200, if you use the telephoto end of the larger lense you should be able to get quite close in without being actually to close to the subject. The problem with macro photography it is expensive the lenses the tripod the release shutter swith the macro flash ring your not going to get it on your budget, to begin with so go for the all round lenses and as you start to be able to afford them then get into the specialist lenses and set up
 

siodre

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i think the only company who calls it micro is nikon. canon uses the term macro. same thing.

these were shot with the original 100mm f/2.8 macro (the non-L version) and extension tubes. if i had to have one or the other i'd take the extension tubes.

2999561197_3c6d27a0d1_m.jpg
 

Hoogle

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I agree the extension tubes are a lot more budget and just as effective in most scenarios and you get a normal lense to use for other things until you find what area of photography you click to
 

Burned Ice

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oooooh so macro photography is in fact close ups.... what a missunderstoodment
 

siodre

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if you use the telephoto end of the larger lense you should be able to get quite close in without being actually to close to the subject.
not necessarily. i can get a better macro ratio out of my canon 24-70 or even 17-40 than i can out of the 70-200 f/4 L because of the macro ratio and the minimum focusing distance. this isn't very practical when what your trying to photograph has quick feet or wings and a mind of it's own when you invade it's personal space, but i couldn't imagine trying to shoot macro shots with the 70-200. each lens has a minimum focusing distance and a macro ratio that you need to be aware of when you're thinking about macros.

just looking at the specs of the two lenses you mentioned i think the 18-55 might win out if the bugs stay put. but i've never used either lens.
 

Hoogle

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or if you want to be super cheap and geeky what you do is buy a cokin filter adapter attach your kit 18-55mm lense to the body attach the cokin filter adapter and with the use of an adapter ring to suit the size of your telephoto lense and screw the lense in backwards it looks nasty it feels nasty with 2 lenses attached at the same time but you do get a macro lense or something like this lol Macro photography for $10 | Pixiq
 

siodre

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never had good luck with closeup filters. may as well duct tape a magnifying glass to your lens. you pretty much have to be right on top of something to focus. and the amount of image quality degradation is huge, sharpness, distortion and some major fringing.
 

siodre

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yes, you may get one or two good shots of stationary items from a closeup filter, but look at what makes up a filter vs. what makes up an extension tube and compare quality based on that. a closeup filter is a convex piece of glass that can have a profit made off of it when it's sold at $10. an extension tube is nothing but a hollow tube filled with air, no glass to add distortions, nothing to get dirty, nothing to diffract light. the cheap diy pringles can extension tube has the same effect on image quality (none) as the $100+ dollar set of kenko extension tubes, then only thing to worry about is getting pringles crumbs or grease inside the camera.
 

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