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Creating "old" produce (fruits and veggies) labels


moruno28

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Hello,

I'm new here and am excited to learn from everyone! I've been using PhotoShop since the late 90s, but have never taken a class. Looking to step my game up and work my way towards some graphic design classes in the near future.

Anyhow, I'm having a farm-themed wedding next year and am looking to make produce labels for the centerpieces. I'm wondering if anyone knows a technique for converting photos to look somewhat like old style drawings that were used on produce labels. I'm looking to take aspects of our lives--say a photo of where we went to college or where we lived--and make them look like the examples below. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

IMG_00011.jpgamericas.jpg
 

ALB68

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My first thought is to look at some third party filters..maybe one of the Topaz filters, Redfield etc.
 

IamSam

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This type of effect is called "vintage". Just do a Google search on Photoshop Vintage Effects and you should find some tutorials.

This TUTORIAL was recently used by a member and it would be helpful in what your trying to accomplish.

edit: Ha, Paul....we were posting at the same time!
 

moruno28

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Thanks everyone! Going to look into all of those suggestions in the next couple days so I can GSD on this over the weekend. I appreciate the tips! :thumbsup:
 

Tom Mann

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I can tell you with 100% certainty that there will be no one magic plugin, action, etc. that will do what you want to an arbitrary photo. That is because many factors each contribute in very important ways to achieving the old-time look of the examples you posted.

For example, the aspects of those images that immediately jump out at me include:

a) A hand drawn, probably hand painted starting image. I don't care what anyone claims, you don't get this sort of look by pressing a button or two. You've got to do it by either conventional or by digital painting. Even the very nice digital painting effects illustrated in this thread doesn't look like this, although they might be good enough for your purposes.

b) Odd, limited gamut colors;

c) Paper / noise texture;

d) Selection of fonts from those days and suitable font efx such as inner and outer stroking with different colors.

etc.

If it's sufficiently important (or pays enough, LOL), of course, you can do all of the above things in PS, but achieving a good reproduction of that look is far from trivial to do.

Tom
 

moruno28

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Thanks, Tom. I figured there's not one easy solution, but anything that will get me the general style would be great. I noticed the shading on a lot of labels would be hard to replicate without actually going in and drawing.

Does anyone know the font (or one similar) to that of the Garden State label?
 

Tom Mann

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If it were me and I had to get something out the door to your client, for the base image, I would search for old color illustrations, postcards, etc. from the 1930's through 1950's and see if you can find a suitable one that you can either license, or which is in the public domain.

To try to match the font, try http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ . Also, there are some folks here on PSG that are *very* good at fonts. Maybe they will immediately recognize it or suggest something similar. The inner and outer strokes are just standard layer effects. If you are not familiar with these, just Google {layer effect photoshop stroke tutorial}.

For the paper / noise texture, just Google {photoshop seamless paper texture}, and you will find a large number of tutorials explaining how to add this effect.

If the base image isn't already in that style, there are many, many ways to get achieve that limited gamut color look. If you want the quickest possible canned solution, try one of these (commercial) plugins: Topaz "Re-style", Tiffen DFX, or even one of the freebie "technicolor" plugins (eg, Red Paw). Another approach is to wade through all the zillion free "actions" available on-line, but I don't think I've ever seen one that produces quite these colors. If you feel like using this as an opportunity to learn, this color look can almost certainly be done with nothing more than one or two "Hue / saturation" adjustment layers.

Good luck,

Tom
 

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