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Tom Mann

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What aspect of the image are you trying to reproduce:

a) The out of focus area to the (viewer's) left of the subject?
b) The complete lack of shadows on her face?
c) The over-smoothed skin?
d) The overly orange skin?
e) The overly saturated warm tones throughout the image (eg, the orange leaves, the warm tones on the wall, etc.)?
f) The blown highlights reflected in the window in the upper LHC of the image?

Some of these effects can be approximated in software, while others are best done at the time of the shoot.

Also, the effects that one would need to apply depends dramatically on the image you are going to start with, so please post an example of an image you would like to look this way.

Tom M
 

yurisl

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What aspect of the image are you trying to reproduce:

a) The out of focus area to the (viewer's) left of the subject?
b) The complete lack of shadows on her face?
c) The over-smoothed skin?
d) The overly orange skin?
e) The overly saturated warm tones throughout the image (eg, the orange leaves, the warm tones on the wall, etc.)?
f) The blown highlights reflected in the window in the upper LHC of the image?

Some of these effects can be approximated in software, while others are best done at the time of the shoot.

Also, the effects that one would need to apply depends dramatically on the image you are going to start with, so please post an example of an image you would like to look this way.

Tom M
thank you Tom
here is a picture has nothing done.
6U7A0253.jpg
 

IamSam

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Hello and welcome.

I see you quoted Toms post but you did not answer any of his questions. A few answers would certainly help us in helping you.
 

yurisl

Member
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What aspect of the image are you trying to reproduce:

a) The out of focus area to the (viewer's) left of the subject?
b) The complete lack of shadows on her face?
c) The over-smoothed skin?
d) The overly orange skin?
e) The overly saturated warm tones throughout the image (eg, the orange leaves, the warm tones on the wall, etc.)?
f) The blown highlights reflected in the window in the upper LHC of the image?

Some of these effects can be approximated in software, while others are best done at the time of the shoot.

Also, the effects that one would need to apply depends dramatically on the image you are going to start with, so please post an example of an image you would like to look this way.

Tom M
can you see there is a warm red in this photo and the skin looks smooth and do you see that red color effect is not damage to the other color
if know how to get things like this can you show me tutorial to get this look ;)
 

yurisl

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Is this the sort of effect you are looking for?

Tom M

PS - For easy comparison, I've also attached the "goal" image to this post.
WOW great job..thanks
I'm new to photoshop
do you have any tutorials that i can learn how to do this
I'm using
Photoshop cc 2015
 

Tom Mann

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Just how new are you to PS? We need to know this to figure out just how much we need to explain.

Some people wildly underestimate their skills, whereas others go in the extreme opposite direction and say that they are OK, but they have maybe have only worked through a couple of tutorials. One way to give people a more concrete idea of your skill level is to tell us whether you have worked on 10, 100, or over 1000 images in PS, and whether these were tutorials or you were completely on your own doing these.

Here's some specific questions -- are you comfortable using layer masks, layer blending modes, curves adjustment layers, etc. Do you feel at home with the various selection tools in PS? Have you ever used the surface blur tool? How about the selective color tool? Do you prefer simply to use presets from various packages or canned actions?

It's OK if you aren't intimately familiar with all of the above, but we just need to know how much to explain, how much to simplify the procedure, etc.

Cheers,

Tom M
 

yurisl

Member
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Just how new are you to PS? We need to know this to figure out just how much we need to explain.

Some people wildly underestimate their skills, whereas others go in the extreme opposite direction and say that they are OK, but they have maybe have only worked through a couple of tutorials. One way to give people a more concrete idea of your skill level is to tell us whether you have worked on 10, 100, or over 1000 images in PS, and whether these were tutorials or you were completely on your own doing these.

Here's some specific questions -- are you comfortable using layer masks, layer blending modes, curves adjustment layers, etc. Do you feel at home with the various selection tools in PS? Have you ever used the surface blur tool? How about the selective color tool? Do you prefer simply to use presets from various packages or canned actions?

It's OK if you aren't intimately familiar with all of the above, but we just need to know how much to explain, how much to simplify the procedure, etc.

Cheers,

Tom M
i have worked on more than 20 images in ps but they are not good enough..
i know how to use those tools you said and I'm using nik software’s and Portratuer, Noiceware
i don't use any actions
 

Tom Mann

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Great! It's good to know that I don't have to walk you through all the individual routine steps (eg, converting a selection to a layer mask, etc. etc.).

OK. Here's what I did:

1. Made separate selections for (a) all of his skin, (b) his shirt and pants, (c) all hair, (d) the stone wall in back of him.

2. Step #1 put me in a position where I could quickly combine the above selections in various ways as needed to make layer masks for adjustment layers or effects that needed to be applied only to certain parts of the image.

3. Denoised everything using a fairly heavy application of Topaz Denoise. For something like this, almost any noise reduction tool would work.

4. Applied a hue/saturation adjustment layer that increased the saturation of the red-orange area, but used a layer mask to hold these increases to a lesser amount on his skin.

5. Applied a curves adjustment layer to slightly lighten the darkest areas of the image.

6. Made a final adjustment of his skin from orange towards red using a selective color adjustment layer (...obviously, masked only to work on his skin).

7. Used the shadows/highlights tool with a very low radius to bring out more texture in his hair (again, obviously, masked only to work on his hair, moustache, eyebrows, etc.)

8. Used the surface blur tool to smooth his skin (but not his hair or the background).

9. Made a couple of final tweaks to the stone wall to increase its brightness and nearly blow out some areas of it, as in the goal photo.

10. Reduced the size of the image to under 700 px in the longer dimension so that the image wouldn't be touched by the forum's uploading software.

11. Applied a small amount of the usual final sharpening step after resizing. I happened to use Smart Sharpen, but USM or even anti-shake would have worked equally well.

12. Done.

After the fact, I can see lots of areas for improvement, most of which could simply be done by adding a few final tweaking steps, but the above gives you the basics.

HTH,

Tom M
 

yurisl

Member
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Great! It's good to know that I don't have to walk you through all the individual routine steps (eg, converting a selection to a layer mask, etc. etc.).

OK. Here's what I did:

1. Made separate selections for (a) all of his skin, (b) his shirt and pants, (c) all hair, (d) the stone wall in back of him.

2. Step #1 put me in a position where I could quickly combine the above selections in various ways as needed to make layer masks for adjustment layers or effects that needed to be applied only to certain parts of the image.

3. Denoised everything using a fairly heavy application of Topaz Denoise. For something like this, almost any noise reduction tool would work.

4. Applied a hue/saturation adjustment layer that increased the saturation of the red-orange area, but used a layer mask to hold these increases to a lesser amount on his skin.

5. Applied a curves adjustment layer to slightly lighten the darkest areas of the image.

6. Made a final adjustment of his skin from orange towards red using a selective color adjustment layer (...obviously, masked only to work on his skin).

7. Used the shadows/highlights tool with a very low radius to bring out more texture in his hair (again, obviously, masked only to work on his hair, moustache, eyebrows, etc.)

8. Used the surface blur tool to smooth his skin (but not his hair or the background).

9. Made a couple of final tweaks to the stone wall to increase its brightness and nearly blow out some areas of it, as in the goal photo.

10. Reduced the size of the image to under 700 px in the longer dimension so that the image wouldn't be touched by the forum's uploading software.

11. Applied a small amount of the usual final sharpening step after resizing. I happened to use Smart Sharpen, but USM or even anti-shake would have worked equally well.

12. Done.

After the fact, I can see lots of areas for improvement, most of which could simply be done by adding a few final tweaking steps, but the above gives you the basics.

HTH,

Tom M
I'll do it thanks mate.... I'll tell you the result
 

Chucktin

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I see this kind of thing a lot. When I see it it's the result of someone (else's) monitor set to a blue default.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

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