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Gradient Dots


goreisking

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Hi All,

I am trying to create a print...I need the dots to be tight at the top and then spread out further and further down the document.

Please see image.

Pin_Dot_Fade.jpg

I have had the best go at it myself but it ends up looking like 3 blocks. If someone can make the dots look like a gradient that will be great.

Thanks!
 
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goreisking

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You've got correct idea but must be straight lines not this particular way where it is 3D style! Thanks
 

thebestcpu

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After thinking about it, I don't know how to have evenly spaced dots that looks as if they are in straight lines and also have a smooth gradient. I think it is an ove-rconstrained problem. I suspect that the smoother you try and make the gradient (e.g. more transition patterns), you will either have it look similar to random dots and/or having Moiré patterns.

Have you ever seen an example of such a pattern that is along the lines you desired? Also, if a random pattern of same size dots changing in density in one direction can be done in PS I believe yet that is not your request.

I could be wrong about this yet I stopped after having not success and realizing it could not be done or I did not understand your project well enough.
 

IamSam

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Could you not just make your own?
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 11.15.14 AM.png
 

goreisking

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Thanks all, here is the print I am trying to create! The dots need to be same as my artwork in terms of size and then spread out like this. My original artwork is the correct length for this particular print.
 

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IamSam

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Where is the actual artwork you speak of?

And, I asked in the post above........could you not make your own dot gradient? Overlay it, then warp to fit.
 

IamSam

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Then I ask (for the last time) why can't you just make your own dot pattern just like you want? I don't understand the problem.............maybe I'm slow today.

It will take some work but you can do it.

Create a document.
Use whatever tool you like to create a row of dots.
Duplicate that row of dots.
Move the duplicated row of dots a certain number of spaces.
Duplicate the moved row of dots, then move them the same amount of spaces + one more.

Repeat this until your happy.

Once you have the dot gradient, you can overlay it on a t-shirt and warp it to fit.
 

goreisking

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Hi,

Yes but what you don't seem to understand is that it always looks like blocks and not a gradient, plus to make gradient the lines need to all be in straight lines but this particular print the lines are not the same, they are all not level
 

Tom Mann

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...but what you don't seem to understand is that it always looks like blocks and not a gradient, plus to make gradient the lines need to all be in straight lines but this particular print the lines are not the same, they are all not level
With respect to your comment that "they are all not level", I presume you mean that in the photo you posted individual rows of dots appear to be following the contours of the torso. If that's your concern, IamSam already addressed it when he said: "...overlay it on a T-shirt and warp it to fit". Sam's suggestion to "warp it" (at the end of the process) means that you start by first constructing the array of dots with true horizontal rows, but then use either the warp, liquify, or even puppet warp tool to make the horizontal rows follow the contours of the wearer's torso.

Secondly, with respect to your comment, "...it always looks like blocks...", that is because with whatever method you used to make the dots in the example you provided, you did not construct the lines of dots one at a time, in the way Sam suggested, in which the horizontal spacing increases more or less smoothly and in *much* smaller jumps as you go from one line to the next. Instead, the way you did it, the horizontal and vertical spacing jumps in large and exact integer steps, ie, 1 cm, 2 cm, 3 cm, etc. You need to work more slowly and in smaller increments.

Also, to avoid the 3D effect that you didn't like, while the vertical spacing can increase smoothly (ie, with no random variation), there has to be a bit of random variation in the general increase of the horizontal spacing to break up the formation of diagonal lines. Of course, you could also introduce a bit of random variation on top of the slowly increasing trend in both the horizontal and vertical spacings, if you prefer that look. Again, work slowly and in smaller increments, introduce a bit of randomness and you will be fine.

Tom M
 
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Tom Mann

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BTW, if you want to save yourself a bit of slightly tedious work (ie, Sam's suggestion), and instead, buy yourself an out-of-the box solution, what you are looking for is a VERY simplified application of a stippling effect.

This is an effect where the density of uniform sized dots applied to an image is controlled by the brightness of an underlying image. This is different from a half-tone effect (either stochastic or ordinary) in which the size of the dots, not their spacing, depends on the brightness of the underlying image. Here is an example of a stippling effect:

ostrich_stippling-01_cropped.jpg

This was done by a 3rd party PS plugin: http://www.pixeology.com/ArtisticHalftone/features.html

In your case, you would simply make a smooth vertical gradient from black to white and then apply the Pixeology filter to it. This will give you randomly placed dots (of whatever color you choose) whose average spacing smoothly changes from top to the bottom of your image. This result is random, not the nearly horizontal lines of the example you provided, but it would look nice and provide you with an instant solution.

HTH,

Tom M
 

Tom Mann

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PS - BTW, the random stippling effect is one of the effects that John ("thebestcpu") was talking about very early in this thread.
 

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