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3D Little Living Room


gedstar

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WOW Chris seriously very impressive piece of work
Just a little issue with the perspective here I think

Untitled.jpg

Or is it this :thinking:

Untitled1.jpg
 
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Thanks Ged for your feedback.
I'm aware of it, and I can't do a thing about it now.
I had to use a 14 mm wide-angle with my camera setting, because otherwise I couldn't have moved around inside the room.
I started to build the windows from the outside, which was ok, but realized my mistake when I had do 'work' inside.
To break down the 2 walls you don't see was no option because I needed them for the special lightings.
I have to think this over, for the next project.?!!
 

Argos

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Beautiful work! i love the realism and composition. my only issue would be with the election of the background i think it's a little too much and with five windows the light inside the room i dont thing it would be that soft and faint.

Cheers!
 
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Thanks Argos, I greatly appreciate your comment.

The 5 windows are definitely an overkill for one room. I realized that when I started to build the furniture. But when the wholes were cut in the walls and the window frames where fitted, it was too late to go back and start from scratch again.
Anyway, that's no excuse, I'm glad I could finish this project. I learned a lot while working on it, and I'm happy with the result.
 
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Thanks Crystal, I appreciate your feedback.
I'm glad you like the coffee table. Just print out my image, take it as a reference and have it built custom-made.;)
 

Eggy

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Really impressing work Chris! :thumbsup:
It looks very nice but also unrealistic (no offence meant - read further please...)
After my '50s Diner' disaster I started to look at tutorials about inside composites in Blender.
I realised that I made a lot of mistakes because I started with two 'open walls' left and right because I tought it was necessary to be able to have a camera view.
One major point in all the tutorials was that most of the artists forgot to put the 'lid' (ceiling) on top of the actual cube making the light coming from above while this is actually impossible unless you have a light hanging from or on the ceiling.
Now it is obvious that your composition is open on top.
With the ceiling on you can make a part of it in 'emission' mode so it looks like there's light coming from above but not the rather diffuse light like now.
Since you only see two walls the opposite corner should be extended outwards to have the necessary place to place the camera without the need to work with a wide-angle camera setting.
I'm still 'studying' the making of an interior so this is my limited knowledge until now...
But your work is way more realistic then what I produced!

Small Living Room 1700 light.jpg

schema.png
 
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Thanks a lot for your feedback Lambert. Always much appreciated.

Experience from others always help to see the'picture' from a different point of view.
Because you are 3D experienced, I guess you know exactly what kind of difficulties I encountered in this work.
And on the contrary I now have a better understanding about the many problems you had to create your Diner inside scene.

3D work is a stony road, and before long I'll fall on my nose again, though like you, I'm still fit to get up and try again.
 

Eggy

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Yeah, I know what kind of problems and enigmas you're going through...o_O
I have gone through more than a dozen of Blender tutorials about interiors.
Essentially you're working in a box with the camera in one corner. (try moving the camera = N + lock on camera so you can pan around)
You'll have only two wall and eventually and depending on the camera angle, a ceiling.
Therefore you need to expand that box the way I discribed.
Working with light coming through the windows and adding out of sight planes set in emission is important.
Ah well, I'm glad I'm doing this for the fun of it and not for a living, I would be very slim...:laugh:
 
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I checked many 3D interiors and found plenty with this undesirable wide angle effect.
So this problem has to be dealt with at the start of a project.

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

4.jpg

5.jpg
 

Eggy

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Yes and that's why your 'work cube' (let's call it that way) has to be extended to include the camera.
You need that space to have distance between the camera and the point the most remote in the composite.
At the end you'll only see a corner with two walls and eventually a ceiling.
 
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As I promised I expanded the room and gained more distance for the camera to the objects.
Instead of 14 mm wide angle on the camera I was able to increase the focal length to 35 mm.
I also lowered the roof of my cube and increased its emission. This changed the lighting inside the living room to a more pleasant atmosphere.
I changed the outside scenery to less aggressive colors. I added gloss to the leather and decreased the texture of it.
The new render is also a bit lighter and resulted in an even less grainy image.

Small Living Room 1700.jpg
This is the very first version for comparison.

Little Living Room 2nd render .jpg
This is the new render after the corrections.
 

Argos

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Nice! if you just change the frames of the windows on the left wall you can say it's just 5 modern pictures on the wall and the light would be ok! XD

Cheers!
 

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