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Remove harsh lighting from picture


prosell

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Hello,

I realized I took this picture wrong and decided to retake it with a light tent but have a feeling I still may have a problem with glare as I have in other photos. I have two 100 watt photography lights. Is there a way to remove the glare from photos easier than the clone stamp tool and the healing. Is there a setting that can just remove glare because sometimes it's hard to remove glare with clone stamp if the picture isn't the same in that area or other attributes.



IMG_1652 (640x480).jpg
 

IamSam

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prosell said:
Is there a way to remove the glare from photos easier than the clone stamp tool and the healing.
Remember that there are no pixels of the underlying suit/costume present in the white glares. The only way to add them is to clone them from somewhere else.


prosell said:
Is there a setting that can just remove glare because sometimes it's hard to remove glare with clone stamp if the picture isn't the same in that area or other attributes.
Well, not effectively. Your best bet is to re-take the photos with better lighting.

https://www.google.com/#q=product+photography+in+plastic+bags
 

prosell

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This is the lighting that I have. They are 100 watt each. Is that sufficient lighting or do I need more. Also, I covered up the lights with a sheet is that a good idea? Is this enough light or do I need more?




IMG_20161207_105706[1].jpg
 

Tom Mann

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Sorry this has to be short, but I just got off a jet in a city 4000 miles away from my computer and am typing this on my phone ...

The most direct way to eliminate specular reflections like these is to put a polarizing gel over each lamp, outside of the diffusing cloth. Both polarizing gels should have the same axis of polarization, eg, both exactly vertical or both exactly horizontal.

Next, you need to buy an optical grade, glass polarizer to go in front of the lens of your camera. Adjust the angle of this polarizer to reject the specular reflections from the bag. For example if the gels in front of the lamps are vertically polarized, the gel in front of the lens will be very close to horizontally polarized.

This is the the technique used by museums and high end art book companies to make the highest quality reproductions of shiny works of art. Just Google this, and you will find lots of tutorials.

Got to run.

Tom M
 

Tom Mann

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PS - ... and yes, the polarizing gel in front of each lamp will likely be over a foot square, and the polarizing filter in front of the camera lens should be the highest quality you can afford. The lattter will give you the best rejection with the least color cast.

HTH,

Tom M
 

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