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Layer only affecting certain other layers

#1
I have an image where I have luminescent curvey lines (created by creating my own pre-defined brush - then applying an outer glow to them) and I then change the colour of these lines along their length by using a large brush to draw random splodges of colour on a new layer before using Gaussian Blur with a radius of 100 pixels, and setting the opacity to 50%, and the blending mode to Color.

However - this only produces a neat looking image when on a solid colour background, I try and put a pattern underneath and it doesn't look as good as I was hoping as the gaussian blur is now affecting the lines and the background.

So, I was wondering if it is possible to have a Gaussian Blur layer as i described that only affects certain other layers, rather than all, and if so, could anyone give me step-by-step instructions on how to accomplish this?

Cheers,
Mike
 
#2
Select your items you do not want effected on the layers without blur then go back to the layer you want blurred and with the selection mask it will prevent the blur in those areas ......hope that helps
perhaps "JLBerry" can explain better, my typing skills limit me to short to the point. PM him, he's far better at detailing explanations, i am sure he will not mind.
 
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#3
Hmm, I'm afraid I didn't see your edit till just a few moments ago - I managed to get the effect I wanted by using a layer mask and some very careful work with the sponge tool.

Cheers for the help,
Mike

P.S. I'm very new to Photoshop, though I am aware that the best way to learn it's full potential is just to randomly follow tutorials. Could you share the URL of a decent website for photoshop tutorials that you know of please? I'm currently going through PSD learning | Learning Resources for Adobe Photoshop however there are relativley few tutorials on there.
 
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JLBerry

Well-Known Member
#5
P.S. I'm very new to Photoshop, though I am aware that the best way to learn it's full potential is just to randomly follow tutorials.
Actually that's false. The best way to learn Photoshop is by doing a course by a NAPP Photoshop expert, live or using a video or book. Tutorials come much later and are often not as useful as most people think. Take for example masks and channels; no tutorial will explain these as extensive and accurate as people like Deke McLelland, Katrin Eismann and Scott Kelby do (just name 3 random experts).
 
#6
Hmm, I'm afraid I didn't see your edit till just a few moments ago - I managed to get the effect I wanted by using a layer mask and some very careful work with the sponge tool.

Cheers for the help,
Mike

P.S. I'm very new to Photoshop, though I am aware that the best way to learn it's full potential is just to randomly follow tutorials. Could you share the URL of a decent website for photoshop tutorials that you know of please? I'm currently going through PSD learning | Learning Resources for Adobe Photoshop however there are relativley few tutorials on there.
This is a very slow way to learn photoshop. Lynda.com is very inexpensive considering the amount of information you can get in a month if you apply yourself in study.
 
#7
This is a very slow way to learn photoshop. Lynda.com is very inexpensive considering the amount of information you can get in a month if you apply yourself in study.
Mmm, unfortunatley I'm unwilling to pay for a course as I'm primarily based in technical support/junior web development, and learning Photoshop is just for casual enjoyment.

Thanks anyway though :)
 

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