What's new

Preparing pages for print


dalepietra

New Member
Messages
1
Likes
0
Hello there,

This might sound awkward for some but I'm kind of desperate. I had a side project from my job (my boss is very cheap when investing) building a presentation catalog... the only app that I know is photoshop, beginner level. Oh well after 2 weeks I finally came to an end. Now the end-game... printing it. I was asked to prepare the files for printing (no idea why the printing company doesn't do it) and came to a brick wall.

I got the .psd sources... and now comes your part... how can I do it?

The format of the pages is A4 landscape and has 16 pages... so I'm guessing I should combine pages 1 with 16 (exterior front and back side), 2 with 15(interior front and back side), 3 with 14 and so on... and finally the middle will be pages 8 and 9 where those clips will be to attach the whole thing in place.

Right, now, like I said, your part.

My questions are:
1. Should I create a new black document with size that will fit the combined pages? If yes, what size?
2. What format should I save the document?
 

polarwoc

Guru
Messages
1,209
Likes
983
I have a limited knowledge of printing, but the printer should have been able to import each of the pages you made into Illustrator or Publisher to print your booklet. But, if you are to create a document that has one pic that covers the whole rectangle showing two A4 sized pages:

1. Should I create a new black document with size that will fit the combined pages? If yes, what size?
If you are starting a blank document, your size should be 594 (width) X 210 (height). Add bleed extra to that size.

2. What format should I save the document?
PDF is acceptable to most printers.

Let us know how your project progress.
 

JeffK

Power User
Messages
386
Likes
519
I don't know your level of print or layout knowledge so please forgive an unintended insult. I also don't know what part of the globe you're writing from so I'll assume you're interested in mm not inches. I'm in the US and work in inches.

What you're referring to is commonly called a printer's spread - ie the way the printer would lay out the pages to be printed. The way that you indicate you'll paginate the spreads - ie give them page numbers - is correct. The alternate version would be reader's spread so each page would follow consecutively.

@polarwoc is correct. If it is a landscape document as you indicated, then you read the pages the long way. So if you create a 2 page spread, it would be 594 X 210. When it's folded and stitched together, the closed version would be 297mm width X 210mm height,

Remember that the above measurement is the trim size. When the knife comes down, that's the finished size of the booklet. When you lay out the graphics, leave at least 5mm safety - ie keep your graphics, type, etc away from the edges by at least 5mm. Follow the same for your spine safety - ie keep all graphics at least 5mm from the folded edge.

If your graphics bleed off the edge, you should be allowing at least 3.2mm of image past the trim - in the US it would be 1/8 inch.

Your images should be at least 300 ppi.

The printer is also going to ask you what kind of stock you're going to print on, ie text or cover, uncoated, matte, or gloss. They can provide samples or if you have a previously run version, you can give them the sample to go by.

If you can, provide them a file with the original images along with the PDF as a safety.

Most importantly, your printer is your best resource, Any questions you have about layout, bleeds, etc. should be confirmed with them. The less work they have to do on their end, the fewer additional charges you'll see on you invoice. The last thing you want is a poorly printed job that has to be redone because of bad preparation or misconceptions.

I found a PS template for a landscape page showing safety, trim, and bleed:


Best of success with this. If there's any way I can help, please let me know.

- Jeff
 

JeffK

Power User
Messages
386
Likes
519
I am unsure if the OP is still watching this space, but I found an excellent resource link (link here) that guides you in making good Crop and Bleed marks on a PS canvas.
I'd think that the OP is probably past this stage by now but hopefully will see and save this valuable link. Creatives hit the wall when faced with print projects since the dynamics are so different than digital.
Heck I go back to the days when the studio drew crop marks with rapidograph pens on mechanical boards. Really enjoy seeing it all live on in this digital space...

- Jeff
 

Top