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Anyone have this problem?


hershy314

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Past couple days I've just been shooting random stuff, trying to get a better feel for my camera. When I upload the photos to my computer a lot of them turn out blury, but when I take the pic I don't feel like I'm shaking or moving the camera to cause this. Other photos seem to be fine. I try to keep the shutter open as little as possible to prevent this, but even at 1/4000 I've had a blury pic. Is there a way to help prevent this with out a tripod? I do plan to get one, but I wont have it with me all the time. Wont have my camera with me all the time either but will have it with me more than a tripod.
 

Steve

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At 1/4000 camera shake isn't an issue with normal shooting.
This is why I said make sure you can return the camera and lens if the's an issue like this.
Make sure you're using auto focus, and if there's auto stabilization on the lens, use it.

If you're shooting a stationary subject, are holding the camera steady, and are at 1/4000 and the bic is blurry the camera and lens probably need to be cleaned and recalibrated.
 

hershy314

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It's not the camera or lens, if I have it on a table or something sturdy the pics turn out fine. I honestly think it's me. I don't know what it is. I would say most pics do come out right, but there are those that don't.
 

MrToM

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Is your ISO setting too high?

In laymans terms, ISO used to mean the 'sensitivity' of the film....the higher the ISO the less light you needed for a correct exposure.
The downside of this was the increased amount of 'noise'.

Nowadays the ISO still means 'sensitivity' but now relates to the voltage used in the CCD....the higher the voltage the more sensitive the CCD but again, higher voltage means more induced noise.

More 'noise' will have the effect of making the image look 'blurry'...even if the focus is spot on.

I dunno if that's it but at least it can be eliminated from our enquiries if it isn't.

Regards.
MrTom.
 

hershy314

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Is your ISO setting too high?

In laymans terms, ISO used to mean the 'sensitivity' of the film....the higher the ISO the less light you needed for a correct exposure.
The downside of this was the increased amount of 'noise'.

Nowadays the ISO still means 'sensitivity' but now relates to the voltage used in the CCD....the higher the voltage the more sensitive the CCD but again, higher voltage means more induced noise.

More 'noise' will have the effect of making the image look 'blurry'...even if the focus is spot on.

I dunno if that's it but at least it can be eliminated from our enquiries if it isn't.

Regards.
MrTom.
The ISO is set to auto, so it varies from time to time. It's definitely not noise, it's camera shake.
 

hershy314

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I did a little test of my own and noticed through the view finder then cross hairs were moving a little and I had just put it up to my eye. When I said it was blurry at 1/4000 I was probably exaggerating a little. Like I said if I have the camera on something sturdy then the photos turn out fine.
 

Steve

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Get your answers accurate and do the tests I suggested.
Then answer my specific questions otherwise you're wasting both your time and my time Hershy.

I've been an avid amature photographer for almost 40 years.
I'm not interested in the tests you've done at this point.
I need to know the results of the test I've suggested.

If you don't want to do them that's OK but I can't help you if you don't.
 

Tom Mann

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Hi Hershey - Steve has given you some good advice, but in addition, it would be much easier for us to understand the problem if you could post a full resolution photo or two that exhibit this problem.

Best regards,

Tom
 

hershy314

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I know he has, and he is right too. Really anything under 1/2 sec the pics turn out fine but over that then that's when they turn out bad. I do seem to move the camera with out really knowing it. I'll post a pic or two later.
 

hershy314

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Ran the test a few time the way Steve said to and it all came out fine. I guess I was having an off day and just couldn't hold the camera right or something. It was all user error. Took a few pics today only one came out blurry, but I know I moved the camera.
 

Steve

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I usually have it set on aperture priority mode and the ISO is set at auto. Usually shooting at around F11-F22, some times below F11 but not often.
The higher the setting the greater the depth of field but it's not necessarily the sharpest setting which in the middle someplace.
You can check for that with controlled tests.
Aperture priority is a prefered way to shoot by a lot of photographers, but I'd preselect an ISO.

I did a little test of my own and noticed through the view finder then cross hairs were moving a little and I had just put it up to my eye. When I said it was blurry at 1/4000 I was probably exaggerating a little. Like I said if I have the camera on something sturdy then the photos turn out fine.
Again blurriness at 1/4000 is not camera shake 99.9% of the time.

I'll do the test, but if the crosshair is moving it's not going to come out sharp. That much I do know.
That's probably your problem.
1. The camera is focusing on something that isn't your subject so your subject is out of focus.
2. On new high end cameras all focusing points are created equal, not so on older or entry grade cameras.
3. But on all older or entry level cameras the center focusing point is the most accurate.

Switch your settings to use only the center focusing point, at least for now.
Push the shutter release half down to focus then re-frame your image.

I know he has, and he is right too. Really anything under 1/2 sec the pics turn out fine but over that then that's when they turn out bad. I do seem to move the camera with out really knowing it. I'll post a pic or two later.
That has to be a typo 1/2 sec

Ran the test a few time the way Steve said to and it all came out fine. I guess I was having an off day and just couldn't hold the camera right or something. It was all user error. Took a few pics today only one came out blurry, but I know I moved the camera.
You're just learning your camera, that's all. :thumbsup:
 

Tom Mann

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Hershey, speaking for myself, without seeing an example of the problem, the best I could give u is an educated guess. Why don't u just post an example of 2 as I strongly suggested in my last post. With that, the probability of a correct diagnosis goes up by a huge factor.

best regards,

Tom
 

hershy314

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This is the only pic I could find with the problem. I deleted the others. Doesn't look that bad but if you zoom in you can see it. The pics I took today all came out clear. Really I think I just held the shutter open too long or something. PA150564_tonemapped.jpg
 

Steve

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That photo is useless.
You need to post an original image right from the memory card, full size., and unaltered.
There's no camera data with this image and it's to small.
Also make sure you're saving to the largest possible image size in you're camera.
 

MrToM

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Just as an outside observer I'm curious as to why that image isn't good enough...

You need to post an original image right from the memory card, full size., and unaltered.
I couldn't say if this is or isn't straight from the card or unaltered, (see below), but it certainly looks to be full size....3340x2504.

There's no camera data with this image...
The camera data is there, (see image)....what more info did you need Steve?

...and it's to small.
I assume you mean 'too' small......is 3340x2504 regarded as small these days?

Also make sure you're saving to the largest possible image size in you're camera.
The largest quoted image size I could find for this camera is 3264 x 2448 so its actually bigger than it should be?
Does this mean it has been altered in some way hershy?

xmp_A_01.png

Regards.
MrTom.
 

Tom Mann

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Thanks for posting that image, Hershey. I now can say that I concur with your feeling that it was nothing more than motion blur. There are two bits of evidence. (a) Visual inspection of the blur pattern, and (b) the EXIF data that says you exposed the image for 1/8th of a second. I don't thiink your camera has any form of vibration reduction (aka, image stabilization). Because of that, you should use the modern version of the old rule thats says that to hand-hold a camera the shutter speed should be faster than twice the focal length. So, if you want to use a 30 mm FL, your shutter speed should be faster than 1/60th. Similarly, hand holding a 100 mm focal length would require you to shoot at 1/200th of a second.

In the case of the photo you posted, the FL was 24 mm, so you should have used 1/50th of a second or even faster. BTW, this rule isn't meant to be followed slavishly. If you have good steady hands, you can push it slower, but if you are in a high pressure situation or you have coffee nerves, go another stop faster to be safe.

HTH,

Tom M

PS - MrTom - Because Hershey's file name included the phrase, "tonemapped", it sure sounds like he (or his camera) did some work on the original image. That being said, this doesn't change my conclusion that the problem was indeed camera movement.
 

chitkaran

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1. Let the Auto-Focus motor do its job before you press the shutter button further down. :eek:

2. Just hold your breath (do not breathe) when you click an image. :yourock:
 

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