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bar showing folders on left of screen


robwood2

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Hi

I just bought the latest version of photoshop with lightroom but i cannot see where to het the left hand bar that shows all the folders that i have, i saw that it was on a screen when i was looking up photoshop but cant find it anywhere.
Can anybody help please.
Many thanks
Robert
 

Tom Mann

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In Photoshop, select from the menu bar that runs along the top of the screen, File / Open, and it will bring up a dialog box where you can select which file to open.

In LR, you should see the area marked in red in my screen shot (attached below).

screen_shot-folders_in_LR.jpg

If you don't, (a) be sure you are in the "Library" module. If you are, and you still don't see the folders go to the menu bar running across the top, and select, "Windows / Panels", and make sure "Folders" is selected (see 2nd attached screen shot).

screen_shot-view_LR_folders.jpg


HTH,

Tom M
 

Hybrus

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what is the use of lightroom when you have the photoshop?
 

Hybrus

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thank you for your response. it was helpful. it is better to replace my bridge to lightroom?
 

Tom Mann

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I'll respond more fully tonight, but while that article was good, unless I missed a page, it completely neglected to mention the other modules of LR, particularly, the printing module, the slideshow module, and the book publishing module. These can be tremendously useful. For example, the print module is vastly better than PS has ever been in this area. The book publishing module certainly isn't going to put InDesign or its competitors out of business, but if you're a photographer and you only have modest page layout needs, it's a God-send to have it available in teh same package, and at a modest cost. There are better slideshow packages, but if you are a photographer and need to show clients proofs of their wedding, it's wonderful and fast!

Bottom line, PS and LR really are two quite distinct programs, each with different strengths. I use both, almost every day.

Tom M
 

Tom Mann

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I would also add that LR is usually not very useful to:

a) artists and amateur photographers who have enough time on their hands to work on one photographic image at a time, spending considerable time either experimenting with it, or tweaking it to perfection;

b) graphics designers and others who tend to use the compositing, layers and vector graphics facilities in PS; or,

c) amateurs who take the shotgun approach to photography and post practically everything they shoot to Picasa or some other photo sharing site and aren't at all interested in rating their photos, keywording them, generating (on the fly) different subsets, or even just different sizes and crops for different end uses or different groups of viewers, generally establishing an efficient workflow, etc.


OTOH, LR is an incredibly useful tool for working event, sports, portrait, and product photographers (ie, paid pros) who need to quickly select the best images from the hundreds or thousands they shot in one afternoon, who need to get a set of very good (but not "perfect") professional quality images out the door ASAP, who may need to look up one particular image out of the 50k images that took in the past year, who repeatedly need to show their work to art directors and others, who often need to quickly throw together a photo book, etc.

The above distinctions probably best captures the intended audience for LR.

Tom M
 
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Tom Mann

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thank you for your response. it was helpful. it is better to replace my bridge to lightroom?
Ahh ... Sorry I missed this post, hybridmadness. My take on this is that LR does not replace Bridge, even though, in principle, one would think this is possible.

The reason is that Bridge is a much more lightweight program compared to LR, and that has real benefits. For example, (a) Bridge starts faster than LR; (b) To be seen by LR, files first have to be "imported" (which can take some time), whereas Bridge is essentially a very, very capable file explorer and viewer of image files that will display the contents of a directory almost instantly. Also, Bridge does not need to build up a (potentially) large database of all files it knows about, whereas LR does build up very important "catalog" files that must be backed up if you are not to lose your edits, lose file locations, etc.

HTH,

Tom M
 

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