What's new

How do I do this?? Ribbed Glass Effect.


Tom Mann

Guru
Messages
7,223
Likes
4,341
How would you describe your experience with photoshop? e.g., just started a couple of weeks ago, used it regularly for a year, have been using it regularly for many years?

Do you use a full version of PS, or just PS "Elements"?

Have you previously used layers and layer masks, step-and-repeat operations, the move tool?

Sorry to have to be so direct, but we get people asking question like this who range from clueless (who, truth be told, just want us to do some free work for them) to expert. We are willing to help people at just about any level, but we have to know to know what level of detail you need. I could describe the process in a few sentences to an expert, but a novice would need a lot more detail.

Tom M
 

Savaasana1525

Member
Messages
5
Likes
3
Hi tom thanks for responding :) I have about 6 months of experience...I'm taking a digital class right now so I've learned the basics and a bit more. I'm familiar with layers and layer masks. I painted this picture for my class and now have to do another piece and I want to edit it the same way. Doesn't have to be exactly like this! Also I have the full version of ps!
 

Tom Mann

Guru
Messages
7,223
Likes
4,341
I started with this picture of Nixon:

nixon.jpg

1) I made a copy of it on a new layer, and added a layer mask that was completely black except for a thin, vertical white area along the LH edge of the mask.

2) I clicked on the little "chain link" between the thumbnail of the image of the layer and the thumbnail of the layer mask. This allows one to move them separately.

3) I made about 15 copies of that layer by repeatedly hitting control-J.

4) I worked my way up the layer stack, using the move tool to nudge the white stripe in each layer mask over to the right by exactly the width of the white stripe, leaving no gaps.

5) I went back to the bottom layer, and worked my way up the layer stack, using the move tool to nudge the image in that layer over to the left by an amount that I thought looked appropriate to get a similar effect to the example image you cited.

The result of the above operations was a layer stack that looked like this:

layer_stack.jpg

6) Since I was removing material from the image, its overall width was reduced, so I cropped it to the new width. The final result was something similar to the example you cited:

nixon-ps02a_8bpc_sRGB-01.jpg

Obviously, once you have the basics down, lots of different improvements and variants on the basic technique are possible. For example, there are ways (ie, step-and-repeat (Google it)) to ensure all the horizontal movements are all exactly the same amount, as well as ways to reproduce the slight vignetting seen around the borders of each slice in the example you cited. If you are interested, I (or someone else) can go into these, as well. Also, there is a lot of artistic choice in how you select the contents of each slice, how you process the starting image (eg, I denoised it and made it more of a stylized version of the original), etc. etc.

HTH,

Tom M
 
Last edited:

Tom Mann

Guru
Messages
7,223
Likes
4,341
You can have lots of fun with efx like this. I couldn't resist and cropped closer and added some grain and a simulated old fashioned TV scan line effect. :)

T

nixon-ps04a_8bpc_sRGB_tight_crop-698px-01_TV_effect.jpg
 

dv8_fx

Retired Administrator
Messages
13,763
Likes
4,785
Good work, @Tom Mann..... That's an excellent take.

@Savaasana1525

My take on it in mind is different but would almost replicate your sample if done on a similar looking image.

At the moment I'm not free to do and show you how but you can use Tom Mann's method and follow his procedure of working from left to right.

The only difference is that the image's width is first transformed down by 50 - 75% before doing the masking and nudging.

This is important as the procedure may extend the normal size image outside it's canvas boundaries. Doing so will compensate for that. I know your not after "exact" but by the sound of it, you need to do the effect on your entire painting with minimal cropping or extension to the canvas?

Your sample seems done in this way. By the look on each slice/strip, the original image was first transformed to what looks like 1/3rd of its original width. It gives the finished output a different look - more like keeping the accordion edited model :)cheesygrin:) as close and within her body mass and sitting pose in the unedited pictorial shot. With a bit of transform, you can make your work fit back into your painting's dimensions.

You can also do it without first transforming but you first need to extend the canvas size to the right and have to create wider strips in the mask. You then link all the layers and transform the work to fit into the original image boundary before cropping back to size.

Just my 2 sens.....
 

IamSam

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Messages
18,236
Likes
11,540
Last edited:

dv8_fx

Retired Administrator
Messages
13,763
Likes
4,785
Found this, it's a different approach, but it might help:...... es-te...d-ribbed-glass
..
I'm really getting old..... lol... Now I remember what the sample image was.... a composition by Hungarian photographer Zoltan GLASS (circa 1950).....

Thanks for the memory jolt. @IamSam.... I needed that....


edit.... entitled "Nu Feminin".....
 

theKeeper

Guru
Messages
2,313
Likes
63
That looks brilliant Savaasana. I love the slight posterized effect & the color treatment you gave it.

Well done.

Have a good one.
Mark (aka theKeeper)...
 

Top