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Adding attractive variability to text characters (was: Sizing for a new image


Bluie

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Hello


I was hoping to use the image below as the basis for a similar framed print of my own.

Wine.jpg


Mine would be 20" x 9.6" (260 resolution) and would have a real normal frame (even if I make it physically rustic), otherwise the main image
would have two frames which just wouldn't work.


Would I begin, then, by creating a new file with the following settings: 20" x 9.6" (260 resolution) while working on it on screen at 25% of that size - that's about the maximum workable size for an image on my screen (below):

25.jpg


There are many images of wine around - including those in established paintings - though I may have to post here at a later stage about blending whatever wine image I have with the grunge background - I have downloaded some today that I can play around with. Of interest in the attached images is the font. If you look at the 'Y' in 'ONLY', it is black and raised compared to the 'Y' in 'ANY' which is grey and not raised. Likewise with the 'T' in 'FINEST', which is elongated compared to the 'T' in 'VINTAGE'.


I am not quite sure how those differences are achieved, but the effect looks appealing.

Many thanks
 

Rich54

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For the font part of your question, if you compare letters that appear more than once (such as the two D's in the word 'did'), none of them are exactly the same, which leads me to believe the lettering was done by hand. So that's one option... draw the letters yourself. But if this were an actual font, you could type the phrase 'WE ONL SERVE', deliberately omitting the letter Y in Only (but leave some space for it). Then, in a new layer, use the same font for the letter Y, which you can then separately re-position, resize, etc.
 
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For the font part of your question, if you compare letters that appear more than once (such as the two D's in the word 'did'), none of them are exactly the same, which leads me to believe the lettering was done by hand. So that's one option... draw the letters yourself. But if this were an actual font, you could type the phrase 'WE ONL SERVE', deliberately omitting the letter Y in Only (but leave some space for it). Then, in a new layer, use the same font for the letter Y, which you can then separately re-position, resize, etc.
Good suggestion, Rich.

A technique I use often when adding lettering to graphics.

If you look at the layer palette in this image, I have rasterized one letter (e), so I can transform it. You can see the WARP bounding box around the second "e" in "coffee," and I've altered it slightly so it's a little different in size and shape from the other "e."

The "c" is also on its own layer, so I can misalign it, and even make the font larger or smaller.

Agent
 

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Tom Mann

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Re the initial part of your question about the size of your canvas, what you proposed sounds perfect.

Tom M
 

Tom Mann

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PS - Obviously, you don't have to keep Photoshop's magnification / zoom level at 25%. For example if you are working on one particular letter, it would give you finer control to zoom in to 100% or even more, and then zoom back out to see the big picture. I zoom in and out hundreds of times as I'm working on a particular composition. The shortcut keys for zooming are control-+ and control-minus, and are probably my most used shortcuts.

HTH,

Tom M
 
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