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Jergon

Well-Known Member
#43
Well, I don't understand, what 'foo fighters' does mean, but it sounds cool as a name of rock band. :)
 

Jergon

Well-Known Member
#44
BigDipperm.png

In 1944, Lockheed company decided to begin production of small and cheap civil airplanes. The first one was one-seated Model 33 Little Dipper (see another picture). Together with it one more machine was planned - two seated tourist airplane with similar design. The bigger bro' has also one engine (Continental C-100-12), but with wooden propeller placed at the back of fuselage. Both Dippers were planned as a big surprise for public and their tests were provided in secrecy. Model 34 took off first time 10.12.1945 in Burbank. The first takeoff was sucess, but during one of the next takeoffs the airplane crashed due to unkempt runway, the pilots were injured and the machine hardly damaged. As the Little Dipper was also destroyed in crash, the Lockheed company given up production of airplanes like the two.
 

Jergon

Well-Known Member
#45
Blackburnm.png

Following the release of Air Ministry Specification for a single-seat day and night fighter, eight different companies proposed 12 different designs and three, including Blackburn Aircraft, received contracts to produce a prototype. Blackburn's design, the F.3, was a single-bay biplane of unequal wingspan and with an unusual configuration, the upper wing being mounted approximately halfway up the stressed-skin fuselage and the lower wing about two feet below it, the gap being occupied by an enclosure for the condenser of the evaporatively-cooled Goshawk III engine. The undercarriage was attached to the lower wing's front spar, with diagonal struts transmitting the landing loads to the fuselage longerons. Initially the wheels were fitted with spats, but these were later removed. The four Vickers machine guns were fuselage mounted, two in mid-position on the fuselage and the other two on either side of the top of the condenser housing. Taxying trials of the F.3 began on 20 July 1934, but the aircraft was difficult to taxi safely, due to the combination of a short fuselage and a high centre of gravity. Additionally, the engine suffered from cooling problems. Further development was stopped when, after an inspection revealed damage to the rear fuselage resulting from the taxying trials, the Air Ministry withdrew support for the project since the aircraft would have been too delayed to take part in the evaluation trials.
 

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