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Template for creating book cover


brinaboyle

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Hello! Does anyone knows where to get templates (cover size, side size and the back) for making book covers? For real book in this case since they have the back of the book and the side of it too. Or usually the author gives you this information in cm?
 

IamSam

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Hello and welcome.

Does anyone knows where to get templates (cover size, side size and the back) for making book covers?
As there are many different sized books and book covers, it would be best if you could use and resize some existing book cover templates in Ps.
Here is a WEBSITE containing several PSD files of different book cover templates. I suggest that you use these for creating book covers or use them as a guideline for creating your own book cover templates.

Good luck!
 

JeffK

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The web site that @IamSam gave you is a good one. Most templates are created in InDesign since that's what most designers use for their layouts. But no reason you can't do it in Photoshop.

Just a heads-up - when determining page count, a single leaf is 2 pages. For example, pick up a single 8-1/2 sheet and that's actually 2 pages. Pretty basic but so many people have gotten it wrong.

Be careful also of the spine size. That's dependent on the bulk of the paper being used and that's dependent on the weight of the stock. Using a 60# offset text bulks differently than an 80# offset text which bulks differently than an 80# coated text.

It may not be critical - but as an old production man, make sure you have the proper specs to work with. Including the binding method- ie perfectbound, casebound, saddlewire stitch, etc.

If you know the printer, check with them on stock being used, bulking, and binding method.

Just some thoughts.

- Jeff
 

brinaboyle

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The web site that @IamSam gave you is a good one. Most templates are created in InDesign since that's what most designers use for their layouts. But no reason you can't do it in Photoshop.

Just a heads-up - when determining page count, a single leaf is 2 pages. For example, pick up a single 8-1/2 sheet and that's actually 2 pages. Pretty basic but so many people have gotten it wrong.

Be careful also of the spine size. That's dependent on the bulk of the paper being used and that's dependent on the weight of the stock. Using a 60# offset text bulks differently than an 80# offset text which bulks differently than an 80# coated text.

It may not be critical - but as an old production man, make sure you have the proper specs to work with. Including the binding method- ie perfectbound, casebound, saddlewire stitch, etc.

If you know the printer, check with them on stock being used, bulking, and binding method.

Just some thoughts.

- Jeff

Thank you for the tip! I would also like to know about digital covers, for books that are not to be printed. Should I make them as if I would print them? Or should I make them in the size of the website require (not following the layout)?
 

IamSam

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The thought occurred to me.................what are you calling a book cover? A or B?

Screen Shot 2019-09-04 at 10.01.51 PM.png

What is a digital cover?
 

IamSam

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A digital cover is for independent authors who intent to make their book available only online.
This is what I was thinking you were referring to but I had to ask just in case. These are very simple to do using smart objects.
 

JeffK

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@brinaboyle and @IamSam - lots of confusing bits of information. Just to clarify - there are print books (done on traditional offset print presses), digital books (which are also print books but done on digital presses), and ebooks which are meant purely to be viewed on screens. If what we're discussing are ebooks, then what I said earlier no longer holds true since those standards are for print books.

Ebooks are a much stickier ball-o-wax as they say. When I asked my wife, who is an editor at a traditional book publisher in NYC, if her company produces ebooks, she said they do but they are sub-contracted out to a specialty vendor. So this venue is something to be cautious with.

As far as technical specs - and please understand that I'm not the last word on this - there are some common constraints on ebook covers. From GuidePressbooks.com:
  • 1:1.5 aspect ratio, meaning height should be 1.5 times the width of the cover
  • recommended dimensions: 2500x3750px
  • safe minimum dimensions: 666x1000px
  • safe maximum file size: 2MB
  • recommended file type: JPG
Digging further, if you go to Kindle Direct Publishing, you also get a height/width ratio of 1.6:1 with ideal dimensions of 2,560 x 1,600 pixels. They also provide a cover creator which seems a good way to go for this platform.

From Kindlepreneur, there was a chart showing the different height/width aspects of the various platforms:

ebook cover sizes.JPG

So there doesn't seem to be one particular standard in terms of size although the aspect ratio of height vs width seems to be consistent. If you know which platform the ebook will be published on, best to contact them for guidance.

There are also a number of ebook cover generators out there including Canva. That might be something you could look into.

You can also repost this question on this site as "What are the technical specs to create an ebook cover?" and that might draw in an ebook designer.

Moving on, there are the aesthetic/visual presentation to care about. Keep in mind that the ebook will first be presented as a thumbnail so the design should be readable in that size.

Sorry if this is confusing but this is a pretty deep subject. I hope you can get clear direction but also hope that there's a designer here that can provide you some clearer relevant info.

BTW - what Sam indicated as A and B in his graphic are both a book cover and a dust jacket. But that's a whole other universe... :cool:

- Jeff
 

IamSam

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@JeffK - Excellent information! Thanks!

As I mentioned in my first posting, there are many different sizes. Ps templates may work for some but it seems there are much better options, especially on the digital side. Knowing the size and ratio would always be the first step as with any other starting point of the creative process. Knowing what's required specifically is a must.

BTW - what Sam indicated as A and B in his graphic are both a book cover and a dust jacket. But that's a whole other universe.
LOL!! Yes for me, B from my graphic has always been called a "Dust Cover" to protect the actual cover. But I have seen in many cases where folks refer to them as "Book Covers". Had to clarify that here. I have also seen dust covers that contained the artwork/info when the actual book cover itself was very basic, a little more than a title.
 

JeffK

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@JeffK - Excellent information! Thanks!

As I mentioned in my first posting, there are many different sizes. Ps templates may work for some but it seems there are much better options, especially on the digital side. Knowing the size and ratio would always be the first step as with any other starting point of the creative process. Knowing what's required specifically is a must.

LOL!! Yes for me, B from my graphic has always been called a "Dust Cover" to protect the actual cover. But I have seen in many cases where folks refer to them as "Book Covers". Had to clarify that here. I have also seen dust covers that contained the artwork/info when the actual book cover itself was very basic, a little more than a title.
In print, if there was any question, my own philosophy was always to check with the manufacturer prior to finalizing specs since they knew exactly what their machines, and the substrates used, were capable of. In digital, the "machines" are the screens since they're the ones "manufacturing" the image. Knowing what's required by the medium - and the platform being presented on - is definitely a must!

As far as dust jackets go - there are far more options to print on these than on the cloth that covers the book itself. So on the hard/cloth cover, you'll either see some stamped titles, or even left blank. The dust jacket can be printed in process, stamped, embossed, etc. Less costly than attempting on the cloth cover. But if you're wrapping the board in paper instead of cloth, then all bets are off! I've seen some creative done with printing process on paper stock, wrapping the board to create hard covers, then printing a translucent dust jacket to wrap around the book.

As a mentor of mine once said - there are only 2 things limiting design.

Time and money. :cool:

- Jeff
 

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