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Why does this happen?


hershy314

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I was at a car show today (last one of the year) and took many photos. One thing that always seems to happen when taking some interior shots and engine shots is a purple haze that appears in the photo. I've tried several things to try and prevent it. Haven't tried a lens hood, but have used my hand as a make-shift lens hood. Nothing seems to work. Is there a way so this doesn't happen? I've tried to fix it in Light room and Photoshop, but still there. It's less noticeable if I convert it to black and white.
Here's an example of what I'm talking about.
IMG_7883s.jpg

thanks for helping me understand this.
 

Chucktin

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At first galnce this looks to me more like a reflection than a lens flare.
Possibly you've got a lens that has some internal coating failing?
Also I notice rain drops on the Mustang's chrome trim (?) could be that the car's window is closed and tinted and you have corrected for the tinting and now a reflection on the window's outer surface has distorted color?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

Tom Mann

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Hi Hershy -

As I recall, you finally wound up with a Canon EF 28-80mm zoom.

The reason that a conventional lens hood doesn't help very much on zooms is because the hood for this lens and other zooms has to be designed not to obstruct the edges of the image even when zoomed to the widest setting. Because of this, hoods on zoom lenses tend to be quite short and simply aren't very effective at keeping the sun from directly striking the front element of the lens.

In addition, the AR coatings, as well as the internal baffling on this particular lens are much less sophisticated than on more expensive Canon lenses. This means that once direct sunlight hits the front element, the game is lost -- the light will bounce around inside of lens, and with poor AR coatings and baffles, eventually wind up coming out the back of the lens and hit the sensor on your camera.

In principle, one can use their hand to shield the lens from direct rays from the sun, but, in practice if the sun is just at the edge of the field of view, this turns out to be very difficult unless you mount the camera on a tripod so you can watch the shadow of your hand hitting the front of the camera as you slightly adjust the position of your hand (without getting your hand in the image).


FYI, from: https://www.flickr.com/groups/807513@N21/

"...The Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 II Lens is a very inexpensive normal zoom lens commonly included in Canon's film SLR kits.

Some refer to the Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 II Lens as a starter lens. As long as the person using the 28-80 knows its optical shortcomings, that designation may be fine. Otherwise, they may permanently be turned off by the performance of their SLR or Digital SLR.

The Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 II Lens features a low build quality. It is very light - in weight, in quality and in price. ..."


Tom M
 

hershy314

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I did get a new lens, haven't had the same problem.....yet. It's a 75-300mm lens. I like it so far, but it does have it's problems. Then again I don't know of any perfect lens. I don't know if it will do the same as my 28-80mm lens. I think the problem with my old lens is that I cleaned it the same way I cleaned my glasses, which I found out just recently was a bad idea. The lens hood was cheap so I don't mind that it's not really doing what I was hoping, but it helps protect the lens so at least I got that. It fits both lenses. True the 28-80mm I have isn't the greatest, but I still use it. Really no choice at this point, and I'm not about to give up on my photography. I still enjoy it.
 

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