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Wrap texture around object.


Altin Selimi

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Hi everyone,

This is my first thread asking for help but I desperately need it. I have these photos of buildings, and I need to make a preview of them how they would look if they were wrapped with currogated steel or steel panels.

Up to now, I've tried this method:
*) Create a shape on the object where the corrugated steel is going to take place. I'll name this shape Q1
*) Create another squared shape on top of it (Q2) , give this second shape the Corrugated Steel pattern and convert it to a smart object.
*) Use Transform--->Distort on this smart object to shape it like the Q1 shape .

It doesn't look that bad, but it's pretty unrealistic. If anyone could suggest any better method, I would be soo grateful :)

You can see the pictures attached.ERGE.png1477518_857174937627907_1620076687_n.jpg
 

IamSam

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Try this, the color is a bit uniform, try adding a gradient to each of the corrugated sections trying to match the original gradations. Your also missing shadows.
 

dv8_fx

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Just a couple of questions....

Is the second image the original? Are you retaining the wall features and completely covering the beams? It doesn't look right if you cover everything.....

Are you using Wavy or Trapezoid sheets or the sandwich (ribbed) type? I ask this so I can give it a try using the needed material. May take a bit of trial and error to get it right.

Cladding on a building may be a bit tricky as you have to compensate for lighting and shadows in order to get it right.
 

IamSam

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You should already have the areas selected. I had to select my own using the Polygonal Lasso Tool. Then I used the Gradient Tool set to foreground to transparent preset and using black as my foreground color. I then lowered the opacity.
 

Altin Selimi

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Just a couple of questions....

Is the second image the original? Are you retaining the wall features and completely covering the beams? It doesn't look right if you cover everything.....

Are you using Wavy or Trapezoid sheets or the sandwich (ribbed) type? I ask this so I can give it a try using the needed material. May take a bit of trial and error to get it right.

Cladding on a building may be a bit tricky as you have to compensate for lighting and shadows in order to get it right.
Yes the second one is the original. I'm completely covering the wall. It may not look right but it's what the company who does this kind of job needs (Giving their customers a quick preview of what their building will look like.)

I'm using wavy sheets.

Thanks for your reply.
 

dv8_fx

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Yes the second one is the original. I'm completely covering the wall. It may not look right but it's what the company who does this kind of job needs (Giving their customers a quick preview of what their building will look like.)

I'm using wavy sheets.

Thanks for your reply.
Having worked in an architecture firm doing presentation renders, it's a personal, esthetic view. Customer's are always right, tho...... :cheesygrin: .

That's what I was saying - lighting and shadows make it complete. Look at your original. It's the shadows and hilights that make it pop. Imagine if that were just a drawing without shadows.

And IamSam hit it on the head by adding just that.

Take the shaded left side of the building.... the sheets should look darker (away from the sun). If that's the sheet color intended, you should lighten the cladding facing the sun a bit more.
 

Altin Selimi

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Thanks for your advices guys. Here's what I managed to do. Even though it looks much better now, my customer told me the designer he used to work with used a different method, he said he used to make it black & white first but he's not much into Photoshop and couldn't give me any further advice. Thank's a lot . 123123.png
 

dv8_fx

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Looks better but the shadows on the left are a bit too dark. bring it down by 40%. The dark area should only start at 3/4ths into the area.

Use the shadow gradient on the left overhang ceiling as your guide where the wall should be light and dark.

And the corrugated sheet cladding in the upper building recess at left should be a bit darker with the darker area around it made lighter.......

As a guide, that area should be as dark as the shadowed area on the right.
 

dv8_fx

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...... my customer told me the designer he used to work with used a different method, he said he used to make it black & white first ......
I sometimes use that, too most especially with renovation/refurbishment work sample renders. This is so get an idea of the light / dark values of the building.

After doing the needed retouch and texture work, superimpose the black and white image and play with the opacity. In some cases, it gives an idea of how the lighting and shadow affects the look of your work. From this, it gives an idea of what to do in terms of natural lighting.
 

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